The Clifford Township Historical Society will host a presentation by anthropologist Dr. Marshall Becker on the Lenape of Pennsylvania on Thursday, April 21, at 6:30 p.m. in the Clifford Twp. Fire Hall near the Clifford Picnic grounds on Route 106 in Clifford Twp.


The Clifford Township Historical Society will host a presentation by anthropologist Dr. Marshall Becker on the Lenape of Pennsylvania on Thursday, April 21, at 6:30 p.m. in the Clifford Twp. Fire Hall near the Clifford Picnic grounds on Route 106 in Clifford Twp.
The program is in preparation for the public unveiling of a large mural project by local artist Michelle Mclain. The mural will complement the public display of a dugout canoe discovered in a small lake in Clifford Twp.  Mclain’s mural will depict the site, the creation of a dugout canoe, and Native Americans believed to be responsible for the dug out canoe.
Dr. Marshall Becker has spent 40 years researching the Lenape of Southeastern Pennsylvania, their native and colonial neighbors, and how they all used wampum. His many publications in scholarly and popular journals document the success of the Lenape in preserving their lifestyle. In addition to publishing studies of wampum, Dr. Becker has lectured to many groups. A number of granting agencies have supported Dr. Becker's work, including the National Science Foundation and the National Geographic Society. He is currently a Senior Fellow in Anthropology at the University of Pennsylvania, the school from which he received a PhD.
The Lenape of the lower Delaware Valley are Pennsylvania's best known Native Americans, but other Native American groups occupied parts of the Commonwealth as well, including the Susquehannock, Monongahela and the Erie ("Cat"). While each group varied in culture, history and the way in which they reacted to the arrival of the Europeans, historical records reveal how they were inter-related in interesting ways. By focusing on the story of the Lenape, we can see how a people's culture changed during the early colonial period and how the Lenape, and perhaps others, survive to the present. Stone tools and other artifacts made by Native Americans supplement this slide-illustrated lecture.
The program is offered free to the public with the support of the Lackawanna Heritage Valley Authority.